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- FLSA Section 14(c) Advisor

Acceptable Methods of Work Measurements Under FLSA Section 14(c)

No particular method of work measurement is mandated when creating the standard. But whatever method is used must be verifiable and conducted through the use of established industrial work measurement techniques.

The U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division accepts, for example, such methods as stopwatch time studies, Methods-Time Measurement (MTM) and Modular Arrangement of Predetermined Time Standards (MODAPTS).

  1. Methods-Time Measurement (MTM) is a work measurement system established in 1948 in which a predetermined time value is assigned to every manual motion involved in performing a given task. The time required to complete a unit of work is derived by first adding together the time values for each motion involved, and then adding a personal time, delay, and fatigue factor (known as a PF&D factor). Generally, not less than a 15% allowance (nine or ten minutes per hour) is used to allow for PF&D. The original MTM (now referred to as MTM-1) had 450 time values. It has been replaced by a simplified version, known as MTM-2, which has only 30 to 50 time values and thus is easier to learn and apply accurately.

  2. Modular Arrangement of Predetermined Time Standards (MODAPTS) is a work measurement system developed by Australian chemical engineer C.G. Heyde and introduced in 1966. MODAPTS is a predetermined time system that deals with standard time values or units of human physical work, termed "modules" or "MODS." These MODS are related to movements of the human body as work is performed. Proponents of this system claim that, of all predetermined time standards systems, MODAPTS is the fastest to use, the most accurate, and the easiest to learn. MODAPTS proponents claim this system is superior to stopwatch time studies since it eliminates performance rating, or the subjective practice of evaluating the speed and effectiveness of the worker being studied.

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FLSA Section 14(c) Advisor | Wage and Hour Division